Fresh whole chicken priced at $20 in 1989 $36.38 in 2018

Historical Price Inflation for Fresh whole chicken

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Prices for Fresh Whole Chicken, 1989-2018 ($20)

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, prices for fresh whole chicken were 81.91% higher in 2018 versus 1989 (a $16.38 difference in value).

Between 1989 and 2018: Fresh whole chicken experienced an average inflation rate of 2.08% per year. This rate of change indicates significant inflation. In other words, fresh whole chicken costing $20 in the year 1989 would cost $36.38 in 2018 for an equivalent purchase. Compared to the overall inflation rate of 2.46% during this same period, inflation for fresh whole chicken was lower.

In the year 1989: Pricing changed by 9.63%, which is significantly above the average yearly change for fresh whole chicken during the 1989-2018 time period. Compared to inflation for all items in 1989 (4.83%), inflation for fresh whole chicken was much higher.

Price Inflation for Fresh whole chicken since 1935

Consumer Price Index, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Years with the largest changes in pricing: 1973 (44.27%), 1942 (20.18%), and 1943 (19.06%).

Raw Consumer Price Index data from U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics for Fresh whole chicken:

Year 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
CPI 36.223 38.331 39.808 39.685 35.585 35.969 38.723 46.538 55.408 57.277 58.592 65.977 69.500 77.069 72.669 69.531 72.862 73.131 71.308 64.392 67.008 58.738 57.315 56.585 51.577 52.423 47.362 50.008 49.269 48.169 49.785 52.731 48.746 51.146 54.123 52.338 52.923 53.446 77.108 72.285 81.423 76.885 77.262 85.646 87.246 94.415 96.515 94.754 96.269 108.969 104.500 115.415 113.277 125.069 137.115 134.938 131.700 131.869 138.000 140.085 142.223 152.562 158.469 159.577 161.823 162.877 167.977 169.092 165.792 182.369 186.708 184.031 196.176 207.853 211.823 211.065 219.049 229.451 243.490 252.024 253.483 249.434 244.847 249.420

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Buying power of $20 since 1989

Below are calculations of equivalent buying power for Fresh whole chicken, over time, for $20 beginning in 1989. Each of the amounts below is equivalent in terms of what it could buy at the time:

Year USD Value Inflation Rate
1989 $20.00 9.63%
1990 $19.68 -1.59%
1991 $19.21 -2.40%
1992 $19.23 0.13%
1993 $20.13 4.65%
1994 $20.43 1.51%
1995 $20.75 1.53%
1996 $22.25 7.27%
1997 $23.11 3.87%
1998 $23.28 0.70%
1999 $23.60 1.41%
2000 $23.76 0.65%
2001 $24.50 3.13%
2002 $24.66 0.66%
2003 $24.18 -1.95%
2004 $26.60 10.00%
2005 $27.23 2.38%
2006 $26.84 -1.43%
2007 $28.61 6.60%
2008 $30.32 5.95%
2009 $30.90 1.91%
2010 $30.79 -0.36%
2011 $31.95 3.78%
2012 $33.47 4.75%
2013 $35.52 6.12%
2014 $36.76 3.50%
2015 $36.97 0.58%
2016 $36.38 -1.60%
2017 $35.71 -1.84%
2018 $36.38 1.87%*
* Not final. See inflation summary for latest details.

How to calculate the inflation rate for fresh whole chicken, 1989-2018

Start with the inflation rate formula:

CPI in 2018 / CPI in 1989 * 1989 USD value = 2018 USD value

Then plug in historical CPI values from above. The CPI for Fresh whole chicken was 137.115 in the year 1989 and 249.420 in 2018:

249.420 / 137.115 * $20 = $36.38

Therefore, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, $20 in 1989 has the same "purchasing power" as $36.38 in 2018 (in the CPI category of Fresh whole chicken).


Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics began tracking the Consumer Price Index for Fresh whole chicken in 1935. In addition to fresh whole chicken, the index produces monthly data on changes in prices paid by urban consumers for a variety of goods and services.

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